Wellfond Pets Singapore

Our Breeds

View a list of all our available breeds and more information about their personalities before you make a decision!

Poodles

(Maltipoo / Cavapoo / Cockapoo / Goldendoodle / Schnoodle / Labradoodle / Morkipoo / Shihpoo)

Bichon Frise

Dachshunds

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

(Cavapoo / Cavachon / cavadoodle )

Maltese

(Maltipoo / Morkie)

Yorkshire Terrier

Corgi

Beagle

Schnauzers

Shiba

French bulldog

West Highland Terrier

Collie

Pug

Poodles

The poodle is an extremely smart, energetic, and friendly member of the non-sporting group that originated in Germany and is known for its curly coat. Under the poodle’s frilly, low-shedding coat is a powerful athlete and an overall wonderful companion. These dogs typically get along with people very well and can be trained in a variety of tasks. Poodles tend to have a friendly and outgoing personality. High energy and intelligence also influence their temperament, and they prefer to have an active lifestyle. They generally are good around kids and even open to meeting strangers. A miniature poodle makes a perfect addition to every family because they are known to be great with children. They thrive on the affection, embraces and playtime that children will give them. Both the kids and the pooch will get a lot of exercises while they’re at it!

Poodles require ample daily exercise and mental stimulation to keep them happy and healthy. They also need consistent training and are typically adept at picking up new skills. Plus, their curly coat needs a fair amount of grooming attention.

Exercise

All sizes of poodle have a high energy level, along with high mental stimulation needs. They need at least an hour of exercise per day. Brisk walks, jogging, hiking, and swimming all are great options to give them exercise. And as retrievers, they love a game of fetch. Plus, they excel in dog sports, such as agility, which also can challenge them mentally. In addition, classes for service dogs, therapy dogs, and similar activities are a great way to challenge them mentally and physically.

Grooming

The coarse, curly, low-shedding, single-layer coat of a poodle grows continuously. It needs regular haircuts to keep it looking its best. Most owners keep the coat short for easier maintenance. You can either learn how to trim it at home or take your poodle to a groomer roughly every four to six weeks.

Regular brushing also is essential, as the hair is retained in the coat rather than being shed. This can lead to matting if you don’t brush your poodle fully to the skin. It’s best to brush at least two to three times per week, and some owners do so daily.

Baths and nail trims will be required about every four to six weeks. Also, check your dog’s ears at least weekly to see whether they need cleaning or have any abnormalities. Finally, aim to brush your dog’s teeth every day.

Training

Like all dogs, poodles require proper training and socialization to be happy and well-adjusted. Because poodles are extremely smart and eager to please, they can easily be trained to perform a variety of commands and tricks. But they also can learn that they can get away with bad habits if you aren’t consistent in your training. So aim to start training when your dog is still a puppy with a basic obedience class.

Also, start socialization as early as possible by exposing your dog to different people, other dogs, and various settings. Most poodles love people and can even be good in multi-pet households when raised with the other pets. Plus, poodles are generally good around children.

Bichon Frise

Bichons tend to have a very playful and affectionate personality, and they love people. They also have a good temperament for kids and other household pets. They respond fairly well to training and typically don’t bark a lot.

Bichons don’t need an excessive amount of activity, but they shouldn’t be couch potatoes either. They also require proper training and socialization to be well-mannered dogs. And their grooming is somewhat involved.

Exercise

Bichons often have bursts of high energy followed by restful spells. They should get at least an hour of exercise per day via activities such as walks and play sessions. It’s ideal to have a fenced area where they can run freely, as well. Many bichons also enjoy dog sports to challenge their bodies and minds.

Grooming

The soft, curly coat of the bichon grows continuously and sheds minimally. Because of this coat type, routine grooming is an absolute necessity. Otherwise, the coat can become matted and tangled. Bichons should be brushed at least two to three times per week. Haircuts are usually necessary every four to six weeks. Make sure to keep the hair around the eyes trimmed to maintain a clear sightline

Bichons also will need a bath roughly every month, depending on how dirty they get. Their white fur shows dirt easily, and they are prone to developing tear stains around their eyes. Check the nails about every month to see whether they need a trim. And look in your dog’s ears weekly for any wax buildup, dirt, and other abnormalities. Finally, aim to brush your bichon’s teeth daily to help prevent dental disease.

Training

The bichon needs proper training and socialization to be happy and well-adjusted. Do not make the mistake of skipping training just because the bichon is a small and generally affable dog. Bad habits can develop when you let training slide. Bichons tend to learn quickly, though housebreaking can take some extra effort. They respond well to positive training methods; harsh corrections can cause them to shut down and not learn.

Socialize your bichon with different people and in various scenarios to boost its comfort and confidence. Bichons tend to be adaptable dogs who are friendly with strangers, but it’s good to reinforce this with positive experiences.

If you must be away from home for long periods on most days, a bichon might develop separation anxiety and destructive habits. Having another dog for company might help. Crate training can also help curb destructive behavior when you are away from home.

Dachshunds

Mini Dachshunds are friendly with people of all ages, including gentle children. However, due to the Mini Dachshund’s small size and fragile back, adults should supervise all interactions between young children and the dog. Though Mini Dachshunds tend to get along well with other family dogs, they may get a little scrappy with strange dogs. This tough-dog attitude can be to the Mini Dachshund’s detriment should it decide to get into a skirmish with a much larger dog. Some Mini Dachshunds get along with family cats, but others may see kitty as something to chase.

With its long body and very short legs, the Dachshund’s unusual body type allowed it to fit into small spaces. However, despite being short, the Dachshund is strong and muscular, which aided its efforts to dig and crawl through tight spaces, traversing tree roots, rocks and other obstacles. The Dachshund also needed a bold and courageous temperament in order to face down ferocious badgers. Today, the Dachshund remains fearless and determined in everything it does, though its most important job is that of loyal friend and companion.

Grooming

Grooming requirements for the Mini Dachshund vary depending on the type of coat. Smooth Mini Dachshunds are wash and wear. Brush weekly with a hound glove or rubber curry brush to remove loose hair. Brush and comb the longhaired and rough varieties a few times a week with a soft slicker brush, taking care to untangle the longer hair on the ears, belly and tail (and beard, for rough Dachshunds). These varieties may also need occasional trimming by a professional groomer. For all coat types, bathe your Mini Dachshund when it becomes dirty and trim the nails every other week. Regularly check inside your Mini Dachshund’s ears and clean them using a pet safe ear cleaner if they look dirty.
 

Exercise & Training

Though Mini Dachshunds are smart, they can be a little stubborn so it’s important to use the right training methods. Positive methods like clicker training tend to work well. Dachshunds love food, so tasty treats help get good results. Though Mini Dachshunds are active, those short legs mean they can get ample exercise with a few walks a day and off-leash games of fetch in the yard. Your Mini Dachshund may also enjoy training for dog sports and activities like flyball, tracking, earthdog and nosework. Always keep your Mini Dachshund on a leash or in a safely enclosed area or it may run off when it catches the scent of squirrels or other furry critters to chase.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

The cavalier King Charles spaniel is one of the largest and most popular toy dog breeds, often called the perfect lap dog. The affectionate, active, and family-friendly dog is known for its silky, wavy coat; short legs; floppy ears; and distinctive feathered features.Cavalier King Charles spaniels are known for generally being incredibly affectionate, sociable, happy-go-lucky, and eager to please. They usually thrive in the company of humans and other dogs and, for this reason, they would suit a household where they will not regularly be left alone.

They can make great family pets and are also popular with the elderly, as they are not too demanding or hyperactive. Even the most tolerant of breeds should, however, be left undisturbed when sleeping and eating, and children should be guided on the most appropriate way to interact with dogs.

While this breed does often enjoy snuggling up for a cuddle on the sofa, it does not mean that this dog is a couch potato and, although it is classified as a toy breed, this pup still enjoys and benefits from plenty of exercise and training. In addition, if the cavalier’s coat is neglected, it can become sloppy and knotted, particularly around the ears.

Exercise

Though this dog will greatly appreciate a good, solid walk for about 30 to 60 minutes a day, a bit more exercise may be needed for the breed. If you walk your dog for half an hour, then another half an hour spent playing fetch will suffice for your cavalier.

Grooming

If you are looking for a breed with a low-maintenance grooming regime, this may not be the dog for you. The dog’s feathered ears and feet need regular maintenance to ensure that it does not get tangled or matted. It will need combing out a few times a week, or some owners choose to have the dog’s coat clipped down for ease of maintenance and to help keep the pup stay cooler in hot climates. It is a breed that sheds its coat, but not excessively.

Training

Cavalier King Charles spaniels are usually extremely eager to please, and they are very food motivated. This means that they will respond well to positive, force-free training methods and are generally easy to train. These dogs do well in competitive sports, such as agility and obedience.

Maltese

The Maltese is a small and affectionate toy dog breed that hails from the Mediterranean region and is known for its trademark silky, white fur that accentuates its big, dark eyes. It can make for a charming lapdog, though it does still need daily exercise. The Maltese also can be an alert and fearless watchdog, despite its small size. Plus, it can be a good option for those who want a low-shedding dog, though it does require some involved grooming. Maltese tend to be very affectionate with their family. But their watchdog tendencies can make them somewhat defensive around strangers. They can be a bit stubborn when it comes to training, and they are a medium-energy breed.

Maltese need exercise and playtime every day, and they prefer to receive a lot of attention. They need proper training and socialization to ensure they have good manners. And they have fairly high grooming needs.

Exercise

The Maltese have a moderate energy level. They should get at least a half hour to an hour of exercise per day via brisk walks, hikes, fetch, and other play. Puzzle toys and even dog sports like agility can help challenge them mentally, as well. Due to their small size, they don’t require that much space to get in a good workout.

Grooming

The silky coat of the Maltese grows continuously. For easier maintenance, many owners opt to trim the coat short, and it takes on a wavy, fluffy quality. Others keep the coat long and flowing.

Because of this coat type, routine grooming is an absolute necessity. The Maltese should be brushed two to three times per week and up to daily if the coat is kept long. Regular trims will be necessary as well to maintain the desired coat length.

Furthermore, weekly to monthly baths will be necessary to keep the coat clean. Check to see whether the ears need cleaning weekly, and see whether your dog is due for a nail trim roughly once a month. In addition, Maltese are prone to showing tear stains underneath their eyes. There are products available at pet stores to help remove these stains. Moreover, those cute bows or topknots you see on a Maltese serve the purpose of keeping the hair out of the dog’s eyes to prevent irritation.

Finally, this breed needs good attention to dental hygiene to prevent teeth and gum problems. Aim to brush your dog’s teeth daily, and take it for professional cleaning as needed.

Training

Like all dogs, the Maltese needs proper training and socialization to be happy and well-adjusted. These dogs can be somewhat headstrong, and centuries of living closely with people have taught them how to get what they want. However, they still respond fairly well to training when offered treats and other positive reinforcement.

Aim to start training and socialization when your dog is a puppy. Enroll in a puppy obedience class as soon as your dog meets the age requirement. And expose it to different people, other animals, and various situations. Maltese can be protective around strangers and in strange situations, potentially barking a lot or nipping. So it’s important to instill comfort and confidence in them, along with good manners.

Yorkshire Terrer

The Yorkshire terrier is a small toy dog breed native to England with a long, silky coat that’s often black and tan. Also known as Yorkies, these dogs have tenacious but affectionate personalities. They tend to be very vocal, protective, and loyal. And, despite their small size, they can make excellent guard dogs. But, at heart, Yorkies are wonderful companions that enjoy pampering and snuggling up to their loved ones.

Despite their diminutive size, most Yorkies have a big personality. They generally have an affectionate yet feisty temperament. They love to snuggle, but they also can be very active, playful, and vigilant.

Yorkies are more than just lap dogs. This breed can be quite vocal and stubborn at times. Early training and socialization with people and other dogs are important for the Yorkie and can help keep that big personality from getting out of control. Regular grooming also is essential to keep a Yorkie looking and feeling its best.

Exercise

Yorkies are no couch potato. They are active little dogs that need regular exercise and mental stimulation to keep them happy and healthy. Aim to provide two 15- to 30-minute walks per day. Going at a moderate pace should be sufficient for a Yorkie to burn off energy. Yorkies also should be able to run and play off leash. Games of fetch and other dog sports, such as agility, will help to give a Yorkie mental stimulation along with exercise.

Yorkies are not well-suited to extreme temperatures, hot or cold, so plan outdoor exercise accordingly. Try to go out during the coolest part of the day in hot weather, and provide a sweater or coat in cold weather. Indoor play is also a good option, as Yorkies don’t need much room to work out their little bodies.

Grooming

Yorkies are known to be low-shedders. They have silky, continuously growing hair that requires a fair amount of grooming. If the coat is kept long, it should be brushed daily to prevent tangles and mats. It also will need regular trims to prevent it from dragging, and the hair on the dog’s head should either be cut short or put in a hairband to keep it out of the dog’s eyes. To avoid this hassle, many Yorkie owners choose to keep their dog’s coat short (usually cut by a groomer every several weeks).

Plan on a bath every week or two, and check your dog’s ears at least weekly for any dirt and debris. Nail trims will be necessary roughly every month, depending on how much your dog wears down its nails. And teeth ideally should be brushed every day.

Training

Yorkies are bright little dogs that can take to training fairly well, though they can be bossy at times. Still, they tend to respond very well to positive reinforcement. Aim to start training when your Yorkie is still a puppy to prevent bad habits from forming and to socialize it with various people, other animals, and situations. Attending a puppy obedience class as soon as your dog meets the age requirement is a good option for both training and socialization.

Corgi

The Pembroke Welsh corgi is a small- to medium-sized herding dog of short stature and sturdy build. Known for its low-set body, large erect ears, and stubby tail, the Pembroke also has a reputation for being a wonderful companion. Pembroke Welsh corgis are achondroplastic, a dwarf breed with shortened legs. They are the shortest breed of the herding dog group.

This breed and the Cardigan Welsh corgi are often confused, despite the fact that the two are separate breeds. Pembrokes have slightly smaller builds than Cardigans, their ears are pointier, and they have short stubby tails, as opposed to the long tail of the Cardigan.

Pembroke Welsh corgis are very intelligent, active, and loyal. Pembrokes tend to be good with other dogs and cats that are part of their household, especially if they were raised together. However, they can be territorial around other dogs and cats as the breed was developed to drive off strange dogs around the flocks. This might lead to aggression at the dog park or against animals that enter your yard.

Pembroke Welsh corgis can be excellent, loyal, and happy companions for the right household, as long as their exercise, grooming, and training needs are met. Too much unreleased energy and a lack of training can lead to excessive barking and other behavior problems.

Exercise

Intelligent and hard-working, the Pembroke excels at herding and most dog sports. This breed requires plenty of exercise on a regular basis, which means a minimum of one hour a day.

Grooming

The Pembroke Welsh corgi has a medium-length topcoat with a short undercoat. The breed tends to shed a significant amount, both daily and seasonally in the spring and fall. Routine grooming is essential and mainly consists of hair brushing once or twice a week and as much as daily during shedding seasons. Bathing may help control the shedding.

Be sure to trim your dog’s nails regularly to prevent tears and foot problems. Help your dog keep its teeth and gums healthy by brushing teeth daily or at least a couple of times per week.

Training

Early socialization is good for corgis as they tend to be naturally reserved around strangers. This trait makes them good watchdogs, but excessive fearfulness needs to be avoided. Because the Pembroke craves activities and challenges, training is an absolute must.

Beagle

The beagle is one of the most recognizable medium-sized dog breeds, known for its large, expressive eyes; long, floppy ears; and an upright, white-tipped tail. It has a short tricolored coat typically dominated by white and varied shades of brown. Beagles are scent hounds, hunting and tracking their prey by ground-scenting, and their keen sense of smell ranks with bloodhounds and basset hounds.

Beagles are energetic, carefree, and optimistic dogs, and they are considered one of the most popular breeds for active households. They can be wonderful companions and great family dogs when properly trained and socialized. Having been bred to be in packs, they also get along well with other dogs, and most do well with cats, especially if raised together.

These fearless hounds are well-suited to both hunting and companionship, but they need adequate daily exercise, regular grooming, and proper training. They require human companionship or the companionship of other pets throughout the day. Because beagles get along with other dogs, freestyle running in a properly enclosed dog park can be fun exercise for both of you. Beagles instinctively will bay and bark when they detect an interesting scent, but they may also become problem barkers due to boredom or separation anxiety, and training may help.

Exercise

Beagles have loads of energy and need regular exercise to use it up, even more so than other dogs. Otherwise, the dog may release that mischievous nature inside. Walk your dog once or twice daily and give it plenty of chances to run and play to result in at least a full hour of exercise a day.

Grooming

Beagles have short, water-resistant coats with a moderate to high rate of shedding. Routine basic grooming is all that is typically necessary to keep beagles looking their best. Luckily, their coat doesn’t pick up much debris, so you won’t need frequent baths or cleaning up what your dog tracks into the house.

Be sure to keep their floppy ears clean to prevent ear infections. Also, remember to trim the dog’s nails regularly to prevent overgrowth, which can affect the gait. It is also good to brush your dog’s teeth at least a couple of times per week to maintain good oral health.

Training

As scent hounds, they enjoy sniffing everything along your walks, which will exercise your dog’s mind as well as his body. However, you will need good leash control and training, so you can control your dog if he gets a scent that he wants to track.

Without proper obedience training, beagles can become unruly and defiant due to their strong-willed nature. They are notoriously difficult to train and command, and you have to make it fun and interesting for your dog to pay attention to your wishes.

Schnauzers

The standard schnauzer is a medium-size hard working farm dog known for its trademark bushy eyebrows and beard. The intelligence and sociable nature possessed by these stately canines make them outstanding companions. With two coat colors—solid black or salt and pepper—the schnauzer has a relatively uniform look. However, under that wiry and rumpled coat is a real character, with many owners describing their dog as almost human-like in their antics and expressions.

 

The standard schnauzer is a warm and affectionate breed with plenty of energy and intelligence for any task. However, it’s not a passive pet that you can just leave to its own devices. Be sure that you understand the nature and needs of a schnauzer before you bring one home.

 

The schnauzer approaches life with a focused mentality and is ever alert. At the same time, this breed learns quickly and adapts readily to its owner. The schnauzer needs an outlet for its energy, but when properly exercised and engaged, the breed is neither characteristically hyperactive nor overly lethargic. This companion dog should not be left to fend for itself. They are very smart and sociable, so they crave interaction with their human companions. Plenty of exercise, frequent training sessions, and opportunities for play will tire both the mind and body of the schnauzer.

Exercise

A standard schnauzer will benefit from exercise that includes at least one long walk daily, plus several shorter outings, and play sessions that total about an hour a day. Some schnauzer owners report that their dogs have excellent recall and never stray far off-leash but use caution in deciding whether to let your schnauzer roam free. The safest course is to only let your dog off-leash in a fenced area.

Schnauzers make great jogging partners, will be up for a hike, and also enjoy canine competitions—like agility, rally, and obedience. Training for such events also allows the schnauzer to fulfill its need to work with you and for you. At the same time, lots of schnauzer owners love that their dogs are always happy to curl up on the couch and spend time relaxing with their owners.

Grooming

The schnauzer’s characteristic double coat requires some TLC to keep it looking great. Regular brushing of the fur is important to keep mats from forming and to keep the eyebrows, beard, and leg feathering free of debris. Many schnauzer owners lament how drippy and dirty the beard of a schnauzer can become from eating and drinking. Be sure to regularly wipe your schnauzer’s beard to help reduce odors and discoloration.

Schnauzers are non-shedding and are sometimes better tolerated by allergy sufferers. However, since the hair grows continuously, regular grooming is required to keep the coat in check. There are two ways to approach grooming schnauzer: hand stripping or clipping.

It may take some searching to find a groomer that can hand strip (pluck/remove dead hairs by hand) your schnauzer. However, purists of the breed recommend this over the more common clipper method of grooming. Using clippers on a schnauzer’s coat gradually reduces the wiry top layer of fur and reduces the coat’s resistance to water and debris, along with changing the color and appearance. Hand stripping might be more expensive or difficult to find, but it should be noted that doing so leads to slower hair regrowth. You can expect up to five or six months in between hand stripping sessions—versus the six to eight weeks between clipping sessions.

Training

Keep in mind that mental engagement is a critical part of the training and care for a standard schnauzer. As a working dog, the schnauzer thrives when it has a task to do. Unlike many high-energy sporting breeds, it’s not just a matter of giving your schnauzer a good physical workout. These dogs also need to find fulfillment in using their intelligence and work ethic. If this is overlooked, they will find their own work to be done—which can include destructive behaviors or becoming too territorial over people and property.

However, schnauzers raised by responsible dog owners are known for having well-rounded and reliable personalities. They have an innate alertness and will be quick to sound the alarm over perceived intruders, but they are not generally known to be excessive barkers (especially when compared to the miniature schnauzer). They may regard newcomers with wariness, but will be put at ease when they see these guests warmly welcomed by the pack leader.

Balance is the important thing when training a schnauzer. If you include the right ratio of exercise, training, and mental stimulation, these dogs blossom into wonderful companions. Just be sure that you maintain your position as the pack leader, since the intelligence of this breed can quickly lead to dominance or stubborn tendencies.

 

Shiba

The shiba inu is a small, non-sporting dog breed from Japan that has a short but thick double coat and an overall fox-like appearance. Its ears are upright and triangular, and its bushy tail curls over its back. Shibas were bred for hunting and are still quite muscular and athletic. They also have a reputation for being independent and aloof at times. And they tend to groom themselves much like cats do.

The shiba inu overall tends to have a reserved personality but can be quite affectionate and attentive with its owner. High intelligence and some stubbornness also are generally components of the breed’s temperament. The shiba can do well with other dogs and kids, especially when socialized from a young age.

This breed has a moderate energy level and needs daily exercise and mental stimulation. Regular grooming, as well as consistent training and socialization, also are a must for a happy, healthy, well-adjusted dog.

Exercise

The shiba inu should get at least an hour of exercise per day via walks, hikes, jogging, playtime, and more. Plus, puzzle toys and dog sports are a great way to engage your dog mentally as well as physically. A bored shiba that doesn’t receive adequate exercise and mental stimulation might develop problem behaviors, such as excessive chewing.

When taking your shiba outdoors, always keep it on a leash or in a securely fenced area. This breed specifically has difficulty with recall training and might run off when given the chance—especially if it sees a small animal it wants to hunt.

Grooming

Grooming is relatively straightforward for the shiba inu. Plan to brush weekly to remove loose fur and prevent tangles and mats. But expect periods of higher shedding seasonally, during which you’ll have to brush more frequently to keep up with all the loose fur.

The shiba’s coat stays fairly clean. Plan on a bath roughly every month, depending on how dirty your dog gets. And be sure to look in its ears weekly to see whether they need cleaning. Also, check whether your dog’s nails are due for a trim around once a month. And aim to brush its teeth every day.

Training

When it comes to training a shiba inu, you might need more persistence and patience than the average dog breed. These dogs can be quite strong-willed and stubborn, engaging in training sessions only when they want. Aim to start from as young of an age as possible to prevent bad habits from forming. And always use positive reinforcement methods, such as treats and praise, to help keep your dog’s attention.

One aspect of training that often comes easily for a shiba inu is housebreaking. From a young age, these dogs don’t like making a mess in their indoor space and thus appreciate being let outside to relieve themselves.

For socialization, aim to expose your shiba to different people, other dogs, and various locations from a young age. This will help to boost its comfort and quell some of its standoffish nature. Still, many shibas tend to be wary of strangers, though they typically aren’t excessive barkers.

French bulldog

The French bulldog (or Frenchie) is a sturdy, compact dog breed with a large head, short snout, and bat-like ears that was, of course, first bred in France. This breed is lively, lovable, and playful. The French bulldog is a smaller, distant relative of the English bulldog; while the two share some similarities, each breed has its own distinct characteristics.

Overall, the French bulldog is a cute, affectionate dog that makes a wonderful pet for all kinds of families. Their small size means they can do well in smaller homes, but they are more sturdy than the average small dog. This is a loyal, intelligent breed that typically gets along well with children and other animals as an excellent family dog. The Frenchie is truly a joyful and friendly companion.

French bulldogs are very affectionate, family-oriented dogs that do best when spending plenty of time with their family. Be aware that your Frenchie will crave your company and won’t do well if left alone for long periods each day. This is a playful breed that loves to be around its owners and children (along with other pets in the household, in most cases).

French bulldogs typically only bark when there is something that truly needs your attention, which makes them a good breed choice for apartment living. Your Frenchie will enjoy playing in the house or yard, but overall, these dogs do not require much exercise to stay happy and healthy.

French bulldogs require notably less exercise and grooming than many popular dog breeds, but some can use a little extra training (depending on your specific dog’s needs). As long as your Frenchie is properly socialized with new people and other animals when first adopted, they should become a friendly and happy companion in your household.

Exercise

In general, the Frenchie is more of a lapdog than a jogging partner, but routine exercise is still important with caution. This breed can easily overheat due to its short, stubby nose and potential airway problems. Daily exercise is very important, but don’t overdo it: Playing with toys in the house or running around the yard for limited periods of time is best.

Grooming

Frenchies are smooth-coated dogs that tend to shed at a moderate rate. The breed requires little more than basic routine grooming, including weekly brushing. Frenchies are smooth-coated dogs that tend to shed at a moderate rate. 

Exercise & Training

The breed requires little more than basic routine grooming, including weekly brushing. Frenchies are smart and willing to learn, and teaching them consistently is a great way to strengthen your bond. This breed also tends to be food-motivated, which is especially helpful when training your dog. Socialization is equally important to ensure your Frenchie is well-adjusted to their environment. You can begin teaching this breed basic obedience as early as eight weeks old, and it’s helpful to take your puppy to training and socialization classes when they’re ready. This is a great way to teach your dog new commands while helping it become more comfortable around new people and other dogs.

Most French bulldogs can coexist happily when raised with other pets, but some are prone to chasing cats or small dogs. A Frenchie who hasn’t been socialized with other animals may show aggression towards dogs of the same sex. This breed can also show jealousy and competition in a multi-dog household. Most are friendly with children, but when rescuing a dog, it’s always important to discuss their history with children and pets to ensure they’re a good fit for your household.

Along with its limits on exercise, the French bulldog’s face shape also affects the safety of some other common situations like travel. Take extra precautions when traveling with this breed to ensure your Frenchie doesn’t overheat, especially noting to never leave your dog unattended in a vehicle.

West Highland Terrier

The West Highland white terrier, commonly called a Westie, is a small, energetic dog with a lively and lovable personality. The Westie is very loyal and smart but also possesses an independent spirit. Though quite compact, the Westie is not dainty or overly muscular.

The Westie’s upbeat and lovable personality makes it a wonderful companion. Both active and cuddly, the Westie is versatile and adaptable, making the breed a great fit in most households. With appropriate training and socialization, Westies get along well with children and fit in with all types of households. In addition, this small dog breed is typically suitable for apartment living.

Grooming

The Westie is completely white with medium-length hair. The top coat is coarse, stiff, and dry while the undercoat is soft and fine. Westies require routine grooming—brush or hand-strip (pluck dead hairs) generally on a weekly basis. You may also wish to have your Westie trimmed by a groomer from time to time (generally every four to six weeks). Fortunately, Westies shed very little. Regular nail trims are also important in order to keep your Westie’s feet healthy and comfortable.

Exercise & Training

As true terriers, Westies are naturally curious and alert. They can be considered lively but not highly energetic, so routine moderate exercise should be enough to keep them happy and healthy. Daily walks are generally enough to fulfill the Westie’s exercise needs. However, every dog is different. If your Westie seems restless or bored, begins acting out, or becomes overweight, you may need to increase the exercise.

It’s important to keep a Westie on a leash for walks as they have a high prey drive and will run after anything that moves. Fenced outdoor areas are ideal for this breed. However, due to their tendency to hunt, they need to be supervised. Westies are best kept indoors when you are away from home and they do well with crate training. They are fairly low-energy when indoors.

Terriers are generally smart dogs that enjoy learning and crave structure. The Westie is intelligent and motivated, so proper training is highly beneficial as well as necessary. A well-trained and socialized Westie is more likely to stay focused on you and be well-behaved in public places.

Westies do well in multiple-pet households and will usually get along well with other dogs and can adapt to cats. But a Westie will naturally pursue small animals such as gerbils and guinea pigs, so keep any such pets separate from a Westie.

Compared with many small dogs, a Westie will tolerate you being away from home during the workday without separation anxiety. They are not typically lap dogs but want to stay near you and engage with you by initiating play and games.

Terriers often like to dig, which can be a problem for your garden and potted plants. You can train your Westie not to dig by being consistent in redirecting from an early age.

Barking can be a problem as your Westie will alert you to every passerby and moving creature. If you are diligent, you can train them to just bark once.

Collie

The noble Collie is intelligent, alert, and completely devoted to its family. Gentle and sweet, this majestic breed is a friend to all and is known for being an exceptional family dog.

Grooming

The Collie comes in two coat varieties. The rough Collie (with a coat like Lassie) is more common and the most recognizable. The rough Collie’s double coat is its crowning glory. The outer coat consists of straight, harsh hair that forms an impressive mane and frills. The undercoat is soft and furry. The rough Collie’s face and the lower parts of the legs are smooth.

The smooth Collie has a short double coat that is about the same length all over the body. Smooth Collies are exactly the same as rough Collies in every other way except coat length, so they are a great choice for people who love the breed but aren’t up for intensive grooming regimes.

The Collie’s coat requires no trimming. Although rough Collies need more brushing than smooth Collies, caring for the coat is not overwhelming. Collies are naturally clean and have very little doggie odor.

A thorough brushing out of the rough Collie coat once a week or even every other week will keep tangles and mats from forming. Brushing the smooth Collie at least weekly is also a good idea to cut down on shedding hair, but the process will be considerably quicker for the smooth.

Both the rough Collie and smooth Collie shed. More frequent brushing can help remove hair so not as much ends up on your clothes and furniture.

Exercise & Training

Like most herding breeds, Collies are highly intelligent and exceedingly trainable. However, the right training approach is key.

Positive techniques, like clicker training and using plenty of tasty treats and praise will give you the best results.

With enough daily exercise, Collies are happy to relax in the house. Provide daily walks, opportunities for off-leash running, and games of fetch in the yard. They will usually also enjoy activities like hiking or dog sports.

Pug

The pug is a small toy dog breed from China with a short, smooth coat that can come in black or fawn, a short snout, wrinkled face, and curled tail. They are sturdy little dogs that pack in a lot of personality. Pugs are typically sweet and good-natured, but they have some spunk in them, too. They can adapt to many different living situations, though they prefer climates that aren’t very hot or cold. And they like being with their family as much as possible. The even-tempered demeanor of this breed makes it a good dog for families with kids. Pugs generally have a very affectionate and upbeat temperament. Their personalities are marked by their love of people. They don’t have a high energy level, but they still love to play. Pugs aren’t high-energy dogs, but they still need daily exercise. They also require consistent training and socialization to make sure they are well-mannered. And their grooming needs are fairly straightforward. Pugs need a moderate amount of exercise, roughly around an hour per day. A morning and evening walk plus some active playtime should be sufficient. Pugs also love participating with their humans in dog sports, such as agility and rally. And they enjoy puzzle toys to challenge them physically and mentally.

Take care not to overexert your dog, especially in warm weather. The pug’s short muzzle makes it hard for the breed to cool itself through panting, which can lead to heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Grooming

The pug’s short coat is fairly easy to care for, only requiring basic grooming. Plan to brush weekly to remove loose fur and distribute skin oils. And bathe roughly once a month, depending on how dirty your dog gets. But at least weekly plan to use a soft damp cloth to clean the pug’s skin folds, especially around its face, as they are prone to infection. Make sure to dry the folds thoroughly.

Check your pug’s nails roughly once a month to see whether they need a trim. And aim to brush its teeth every day.

Exercise & Training

Pugs typically are eager to please and respond well to positive training methods. They are especially motivated by treats, though it’s important not to overfeed them. Using part of their daily meals for training treats is a good option. Avoid harsh corrections, as pugs are sensitive and will quickly shut down and refuse to participate in training. Begin training from as young of an age as possible ideally with a puppy class, which involves socialization as well.

Moreover, aim to expose your pug to different people, other animals, and various locations from as young of an age as possible. Pugs are typically outgoing dogs, and having positive experiences in social situations will reinforce their comfort and confidence.