Wellfond Pets Singapore

The Essential Guide to Pawrenthood

View our step-by-step instructions on how to take care of your newfound friend!

Step 1

Preparing for a puppy

Decided on the fur(love) of your life? These are some guides to help you ease your way into becoming the best pawrent out there! Ensure you have prepared sufficient space for them to sleep, exercise and have their business done!

*Tip: Hide all your expensive gadgets and cables well!

Step 2

Furever Home

Set up their playpen, bedding area and pee tray once you reach home.

Make sure you have fresh water accessible for the puppy at all times.

Do let them roam around the house for some time (30-45mins) for the first 3-5days.

They might sneeze due to new scents they pick up in the new environment but you don’t have to worry.
Place them in the playpen and leave them alone.
The change of environment might be stressful for some puppies and it’s alright! Give time and space for them to adapt.

Step 3

Veterinary care

It takes lots of love, time and money to care for your pet in its entire lifetime. You need to set aside time to feed, bathe, groom, train, exercise, and play with your pets. Money is also needed for cages, feed bowls, food, accessories, veterinary bills and training. These costs may add up to a substantial amount in the long run.

Once you have gotten your new pet, be sure to bring your pet to a veterinarian for an initial health check. The veterinarian will be able to advise you on the vaccinations and the necessary treatments your pet needs.

Step 4

Training your pet

Training helps to enhance the relationship between you and your pet. A trained pet is able to follow its owner’s instructions, and should be rewarded for its obedience. The training process helps to build and strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Training also helps you better understand your pet, resulting in greater respect of and appreciation for it.

Training your pet can be time-consuming and frustrating at times, but it is well worth the effort. Here are some tips on how to train your pet:

Preparing for a puppy ​

Decided on the fur(love) of your life? These are some guides to help you ease your way into becoming the best pawrent out there! Ensure you have prepared sufficient space for them to sleep, exercise and have their business done!

*Tip: Hide all your expensive gadgets and cables well!

Essential items:

Playpen & bedding

Food & water bowls / dispenser

Pee tray & pee pads

Toys *teething toys are recommended for puppies

Grooming set – shampoo, ear cleanser, brush, nail clippers, toothbrush, conditioner etc

For out & about – leash, harness, dog tags, flea/tick prevention, portable water bottle

Supplements – as recommended by our pet consultants! They know the puppy best ;)

Do communicate with the pet consultant you are assigned with, they are the best to assist you on this furry journey ahead!

Furever Home

– Set up their playpen, bedding area and pee tray once you reach home

– Make sure you have fresh water accessible for the puppy at all time

– Do let them roam around the house for some time (30-45mins) for the first 3-5days.

– They might sneeze due to new scents they pick up in the new environment but you don’t have to worry.

– Place them in the playpen and leave them alone. The change of environment might be stressful for some puppies and it’s alright! Give time and space for them to adapt.

– Gently guide them when they pee to reinforce toilet training – you can dap their pee on the pee pad / pee tray so they know that it’s the toilet area.

– Simple training can start with positive reinforcement – dogs do so well with praises! You can encourage them with each correct behavior, you can also use small pieces of treats as positive reinforcement! 

They might whine/cry at night when they’re left alone in the playpen – but do not give in as it will become “positive reinforcement” for their whining and in the long run, it might turn into separation anxiety. Just make sure they are comfortable, they have the essentials and there’s no possible dangers, and they will adjust to it real soon. It might take a few nights for them to get used to.

Feeding – 

The puppy will go home with a standard amount of food for each meal, do increase accordingly. I would recommend increasing 10% each week or at least every 2 weeks. Check the size of your puppy every week, make sure they are not showing ribs / or overly fed. You can refer to the chart below.
Always keep to the food recommended by the pet consultant, do not make abrupt changes as it highly likely might cause your puppy/dog to have diarrhea.
Introduce a new protein / food / treat by small/tiny amount – so you can monitor for allergies / sensitive tummy (diarrhea).
If you intend to change the diet of your pet, do it gradually over a period of a week – 15-20% of new food is replaced into the meal each time.

Always have your nearest veterinary clinic and your preferred clinic contact number on hand.

Veterinary care

It takes lots of love, time and money to care for your pet in its entire lifetime. You need to set aside time to feed, bathe, groom, train, exercise, and play with your pets. Money is also needed for cages, feed bowls, food, accessories, veterinary bills and training. These costs may add up to a substantial amount in the long run.

Once you have gotten your new pet, be sure to bring your pet to a veterinarian for an initial health check. The veterinarian will be able to advise you on the vaccinations and the necessary treatments your pet needs. The veterinarian can also help you with questions on appropriate diet, care, housing, toilet-training exercise etc. for your pet. You are also encouraged to bring your pet for a check-up annually to ensure that your pet is in the pink of health.

Vaccinations are important to protect your pets from common contagious diseases, such as canine distemper and canine parvovirus in dogs and feline panleukopenia virus in cats, which can be easily preventable.

Occasionally, pets can fall sick and may require medical attention. If you suspect your pet is unwell, monitor its behavior and appearance. Symptoms could be:
● No/poor appetite
● Sudden weight gain or weight loss
● Shortness of breath, inactivity or lethargy
● Vomiting
● Diarrhea
● Difficulty defecating or urinating
● Reluctance to stand or move
● Limping
● Excessive scratching or shaking of the head
● Moist, red skin, unusual growths
● Abnormal, strong body odour
● Severe thinning of coat

Pets may need an operation if they have a condition that requires it, for example infected womb, broken bone, tumor growths, hip dislocation, or when they undergo routine procedures such as sterilization.

Surgical sterilization of pets is important for reducing the number of unwanted litters.

What is sterilization?
Sterilization is a surgical procedure in which a part of your pet’s reproductive organ is removed to permanently stop it from reproducing. Sterilization is done mostly on male and female dogs, cats, rabbits and guinea pigs.

For male animals, the testicles are removed, and this procedure is commonly known as castration. The ovaries and uterus are generally removed in the female animal. Sterilization is done by a licensed veterinarian under strict sterile conditions with the animal under general anesthesia. Pet owners should consult their veterinarians to determine the appropriate age of sterilization for individual cats and dogs.

Benefits of sterilization
Through sterilization, you are helping your pet to have a healthier life, as sterilized animals are less prone to certain diseases. Sterilization may also help to reduce certain undesirable behaviors in your pet.
● Sterilization prevents unnecessary breeding and reduces the number of unwanted animals.
● Sterilization reduces the risk of certain cancers (mammary gland tumors, ovarian and uterine cancers) and womb infections (pyometra) in the female. Castration reduces the risk of testicular cancer in male pets, and incidence of prostate disease in male dogs.

Heat cycles will stop in sterilized females and so males will not be attracted. Castration in males will reduce the urge to roam and some undesirable sexual behaviours such as urine spraying.

Changes to your pet after sterilization
Sterilization might change your pet’s behavior (e.g. males have less urge to roam and females do not go into heat). Sterilization does not cause obesity. Owners are advised to give their pet appropriate amount of food and exercise to prevent obesity, regardless of their pet’s sterilization status

In very few cases, an older sterilized pet may lose some control of its bladder or experience thinning of its body coat. These are not serious conditions and can be easily resolved with medication.

Common misconceptions about sterilization
1. Sterilization is a painful and dangerous surgery

Sterilization is the most common surgery performed on animals. The risks are minimal if your pet is sterilized by a licensed veterinarian. Your pet will not feel any pain as the procedure is performed under general anesthesia, and painkillers will be given by the veterinarian where required. Most pets recover quickly and are back to normal after 24 to 48 hours.

2. Sterilization is costly
Sterilization is a one-off procedure that will last your pet’s lifetime. The cost of sterilization is small compared to the cost of raising a litter of your pet’s offspring. Sterilization can also be considered an investment, as sterilized pets are less prone to certain illnesses.

Training your pet

Training helps to enhance the relationship between you and your pet. A trained pet is able to follow its owner’s instructions, and should be rewarded for its obedience. The training process helps to build and strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Training also helps you better understand your pet, resulting in greater respect of and appreciation for it.

Training your pet can be time-consuming and frustrating at times, but it is well worth the effort. Here are some tips on how to train your pet:
● Conduct “play training”, where tasks take the form of fun games and are driven by your pet’s playful side. Intelligent pets can be stubborn, so you may have to outwit them.
● Ensure that you are in control from the beginning. However, there is no need for extreme measures. Be consistent in the commands you give, and keep the commands short and simple. Speak to your pet firmly, but not in an angry tone.
● Have several short training lessons lasting 5 to 10 minutes each, instead of a single long lesson, especially if your pet has a short attention span.
● Start the training at a quiet place familiar to your pet. Ensure that there are few things and people around to distract it.

If you have a pet dog, you may engage one of our accredited trainers for basic obedience training. This training with an accredited trainer is compulsory if your dog’s breed is listed in the list of Scheduled dogs.

Which pets can be trained?
Almost all pets can be trained, but to different extents. In each case, patience and time are needed. Remember, pets cannot become fully trained overnight.

Dogs can be trained to do tricks, maneuver obstacle courses, or even become working dogs. Working dogs include rescue dogs, guide dogs for the visually impaired, and hearing dogs.

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